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D7 Chord on Guitar

Introduction

Are you looking to learn how to play a D7 dominant chord on guitar easily? If so, you’ve come to the right place!

Playing a D7 dominant chord on guitar doesn’t have to be complicated or intimidating.

With a few simple steps and a few minutes of practice, you can master this chord and start playing it in whatever songs you want.

By following these instructions, you’ll be able to quickly and easily play a D7 dominant chord on guitar, giving you the ability to play more complex tunes.

So get your guitar ready, and let’s learn eight ways to play the D7 guitar chord voicing.

What is the difference between D and D7 on guitar?

Let’s look at the difference between a D major chord and a D dominant seventh chord and how they function differently.

A D major chord consists of the notes D, F#, and A. This is a major triad, which gives the chord its bright, uplifting sound. It works as a tonic chord and is often used to start a song.

On the other hand, a D-dominant seventh chord is a bit more complex. This chord consists of the notes D, F#, A, and C. The addition of the C note makes the chord sound much darker than the D major chord.

It also functions as a dominant seventh chord, which means it can resolve to a tonic chord, which would be G major. This makes it an excellent choice for creating tension and resolution in songs.

So as you can see, the D major and the D dominant seventh chords function differently, and they can add an entirely different feel to a song.

Knowing the difference between the two and how they work is essential for any musician.

1.) Learning to Play a D7 Chord in an Open position

A chord diagram of the D7 chord on guitar appears.

The open D7 chord is most commonly used for beginning guitarists. You can understand this chord easily if you have a D Major.

The D7 chord has the opposite position on lower strings. Despite using similar strings, the finger positions differ, and the D 7 chord produces slightly louder music.

To play the D7 chord open, Play the open fourth string, place your second finger on the G string second fret (A), your first finger first fret B string (C), and 3rd finger in the second fret on the high E string (F#).

Play strings 1-4; you do not need to play all the strings.

The diagram is below, and all chords are reviewed in the order in the video above.

2.) D7 Guitar Chord (C7 shape)

A D7 guitar chord diagram appears.

Thinking about the CAGED chord forms, we reviewed earlier. All you have to do here is make a c major chord and slide it up two frets, and now the C chord is a D chord.

We will now add our 4th finger (the pinky) to the 3rd string in the 5th fret on the pitch C. Now we have added the 7th.

Do you understand why this works? Do you understand the pattern based on our knowledge of the CAGED chord forms? The C shape in a higher position is now a D.

3.) D7 Guitar Chord (A7 shape)

A D7 guitar chord diagram in the fifth fret appears.

Make an A-shaped barre chord in the fifth fret. That is a D major Chord. To make it a dominant seventh, we will take the octave and lower it a whole step or two frets.

We will remove our finger on the D in the seventh fret on the 3rd string, and now we have a dominant chord.

4.) D7 Guitar Chord (G7 Shape)

Lay your first finger in the fifth fret for a 3-string barre chord. Use your fourth finger on the high e string to reach pitch D in the 9th fret. This is the G-shaped D chord. Now let’s lower the high D to a C, and we have a dominant 7th chord.

If you remember our CAGED chords lesson, the likelihood of playing a full G-shaped barre chord is rarely done.

You are more than likely to have this

5.) D7 Guitar Chord (E7 shaped)

D7 Guitar Chord Diagram in 10th position appears.

Make an E-shaped barre chord at the tenth fret. Lower the octave by picking up your 4th finger, and there you go. A quick and easy rock and rock type chord.

6.) D7 Guitar Chord (Better Voicing)

A D7 guitar chord diagram in 10th position jazz chord voicing appears.

But I want you to start making your chords like this. It will help us get into more advanced chord voicings and extensions in the future.

This is a more Jazz approach to dominant 7th chords; you will need to know this in the future.

How do I practice the D7 guitar chord?

After you’ve learned how to play a D7 dominant chord on guitar easily, you should practice playing it.

By practicing the chord, not only will you become more comfortable playing it, but you will also get quicker at playing it in different situations.

You can do this a couple of different ways, including playing the chord without a backing track or playing the chord with a backing track. There are a few different ways to practice the chord.

You can either play the chord without a backing track, play the chord with a backing track, practice switching between the chord and the tonic chord or play the chord with a different chord in the key.

The most important thing is to practice playing the chord as much as possible so that it becomes second nature.

The more you play the chord, the quicker you’ll be able to play it when you need to. This will allow you to play more complex tunes in the future.

How to Incorporate the D7 Dominant Chord Into a Song

After you’ve learned how to play a D7 dominant chord on guitar easily, you should try to incorporate the chord into a song.

You will become much more comfortable with the chord by practicing the chord and incorporating it into a song.

This will also help you remember the chord and how to play it when needed.

When figuring out how to incorporate the chord into a song, you should first figure out what key the song is in.

You can use a guitar tuner, an online chord finder, or a simple melody to figure out the song’s tonal center.

Once you know the song’s key, you can determine what chord the song is in.

Once you know what chord the song is in, you can figure out what chord you need to play to sound like you are playing the song correctly.

How do I practice the D7 guitar chord?

This list of four good practices you can use when you learn a new guitar chord. Using these methods, you can improve your guitar playing and make your playing even better.

  • Practice the chord a lot – The more you practice, the quicker and more comfortable you’ll be when playing the chord. This will give you the ability to play more complex tunes.
  • Experiment with different fingerings – There are various ways to finger the chord, so you should try them all and see which ones you like best.
  • Focus on proper technique – You want to ensure that you hold and play the chord correctly. This will not only help you sound better, but it will also reduce the risk of injury when playing.
  • Use a metronome – By using a metronome, you can ensure that you are playing the chord at the right speed and rhythm.

Variations of the D7 dominant chord

– D7#5 – You can also use E as the fifth. This chord is also known as the “Add 9” chord.

– Db7 – You can also use Bb as the root. This is also known as the “Bb7” chord.

– D7b9 – You can also use Bb as the fifth. This is also known as the “Db9” chord.

– D7#11 – You can also use F# as the fifth. This is also known as the “#11” chord.

Songs using D7 Chords

Here are examples of the D7 chord used in context broken down by genre. These recordings can and have been played in multiple keys. They have been transposed to incorporate the D7 chord for guitar pedagogy purposes.

I included the links to the chord charts on Ultimate Guitar. com. I am not affiliated with them, but I am a subscriber a frequent their charts.

Blues songs

Here are a few examples of blues songs that feature the D7 chord:

  1. “Cross Road Blues” by Robert Johnson: This classic blues song uses the D7 chord to create a sense of tension and resolve in the verse and chorus progressions.
  2. “Stormy Monday Blues” by T-Bone Walker: This blues ballad uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add a sense of melancholy and longing to the music.
  3. “Sweet Home Chicago” by Robert Johnson: This upbeat blues song uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add energy and drive to the music.
  4. “Hoochie Coochie Man” by Muddy Waters: This blues rock classic uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add a sense of attitude and swagger to the music.
  5. I’m Tore Down” by Freddie King: This blues rock song uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to create a sense of tension and resolve in the music.

Country songs

Here are a few examples of country songs that feature the D7 chord:

  1. “I Walk the Line” by Johnny Cash: This classic country song uses a D7 chord to create a sense of tension and resolve in the verse and chorus progressions.
  2. “Folsom Prison Blues” by Johnny Cash: Like “I Walk the Line,” this song also uses the D7 chord to add tension and interest to the chord progression.
  3. “You Are My Sunshine” by Jimmie Davis: This upbeat country song uses the D7 chord in the chorus to add flavor to the chord progression.
  4. “I Can’t Stop Loving You” by Ray Charles: This country-influenced ballad uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add a sense of longing and desire.
  5. “Jackson” by Johnny Cash and June Carter: This duet features the D7 chord in the chorus, helping to create a sense of tension and resolution in the music.

Rock N Roll Songs

Here are a few examples of rock and roll songs that feature the D7 chord:

  1. “Great Balls of Fire” by Jerry Lee Lewis: This classic rock and roll song uses the D7 chord to add energy and drive to the verse and chorus progressions.
  2. “Hound Dog” by Elvis Presley: This rock and roll classic uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add a sense of attitude and swagger to the music.
  3. “Johnny B. Goode”by Chuck Berry: This upbeat rock and roll song uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add energy and drive to the music.
  4. “Blue Suede Shoes” by Carl Perkins: This rockabilly classic uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add a sense of attitude and swagger to the music.
  5. “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets: This classic rock and roll song uses the D7 chord in the verse and chorus progressions to add energy and drive to the music.

Conclusion

Learning how to play a D7 dominant chord on guitar easily is a great way to expand your musical knowledge and ability.

Once you’ve mastered the chord, you’ll be able to play many new and popular songs.

The D7 chord is also very common, so you’ll be able to use it in many different styles, including pop, rock, country, and more.

With just a few simple steps, you can quickly and easily learn how to play the D7 chord, allowing you to play more complex tunes to help you on your guitar journey.

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